Choosing a Toothbrush: Manual vs. Electric

South Carolina Dentists  Choosing a Toothbrush: Manual vs. Electric Dental Spartanburg
South Carolina Dentists eryer Choosing a Toothbrush: Manual vs. Electric Dental Spartanburg
toothbrush

How do electric toothbrushes stand up against good old-fashioned manual brushing? We went to the experts to find out.

The electric toothbrush has become very popular in recent years — some even say it provides superior dental care. But how does it actually compare to manual brushing?

The idea of a toothbrush is to remove plaque and to stimulate the gums,” explains John Ictech-Cassis, DDS, DMD, clinical associate professor at the Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine. “Most toothbrushes will keep the teeth clean if you know how to use them.”

Manual Toothbrushes: A Classic Route to Good Dental Care

“There are many advantages to the manual toothbrush,” says Dr. Ictech-Cassis. “We’ve been using this toothbrush for many years. It has a good track record.” Advantages include:

Cost and availability. “It’s inexpensive and accessible,” says Ictech-Cassis. “This is the toothbrush that the majority of dentists give away.” Electric toothbrushes may simply be too expensive for many people, so it’s nice to know that you can do a great job brushing with a manual toothbrush.

Easy to travel with. “It’s easy to take a manual toothbrush with you when you travel. It’s not bulky like an electric toothbrush,” says Ictech-Cassis. You’ll be less likely to let your good dental care habits lapse on vacation with a toothbrush that you can easily bring along, he adds.

Puts less pressure on teeth and gums. “You can feel [how much pressure you’re using] as you grasp the toothbrush,” Ictech-Cassis notes. “This helps you to avoid putting too much pressure on your teeth. With an electrical model you can’t feel that as well.” Placing too much pressure on your teeth can wear away at the tooth enamel, causing pain, sensitivity, and an increased risk of tooth decay.

Collected from this website: http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/101/manual-v-electric-which-is-the-better-brush.aspx

Choosing a Mouth Rinse That’s Right for You

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Choosing a Mouth

A stroll down the drugstore dental-care aisle can be dizzying, especially with all the mouth rinse products available.

Anti-plaque, anti-gingivitis, alcohol-free — your pharmacy’s oral health section has dozens of mouth rinse products to choose from, all promising to protect your teeth and gums and freshen your breath.

But how can you know which claims are true? And do you really need to use a mouth rinse — or is good brushing and flossing enough?

“There are three major categories [of mouth rinses], from a consumer perspective,” says Michelle Henshaw, DDS, MPH and assistant dean for community partnerships and extramural affairs at Boston University, Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine. These include mouth rinse products that contain fluoride, anti-gingivitis and anti-plaque mouth rinses, and cosmetic mouth rinse products. Some of these mouth rinses are available over-the-counter; others will require a prescription.

Here’s what you should know when shopping for a mouth rinse.

Fluoride-Containing Mouth Rinses

Fluoride helps prevent tooth decay by helping your body strengthen enamel — the white, harder-than-bone substance that covers teeth. But most people will not require fluoride-containing mouth rinses, says Dr. Henshaw. “You pretty much get that from your fluoridated toothpaste,” she says. But, there are some exceptions.

“People with xerostomia (abnormal dryness of the mouth) might use this kind of mouth rinse, and there are other reasons, like dental caries (cavities),” says Henshaw. Severe dry mouth can lead to a change in the bacterial balance of your mouth, while too much bad bacteria can lead to tooth decay. Fluoride mouth rinses can help prevent these problems.

Check with your dentist if you’re not using fluoride toothpaste. In this case, it might be a good idea to supplement your oral health routine with a fluoride mouth rinse.

Collected from this website: http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/101/using-mouth-rinses.aspx

A Guide to Nighttime Oral Care

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South Carolina Dentists aefrea A Guide to Nighttime Oral Care ADA Spartanburg
Oral Care

Keeping your teeth strong, your gums healthy, and your smile bright is not just a day job; your mouth needs protection at night too. Donna L. Zak, D.D.S., of Zak & Frankel Dental Associates in New York City, explains: “Nighttime oral hygiene is important because while we’re sleeping, we’re not swallowing, so the bacteria in our mouths increase throughout the night. The nighttime goal is to avoid giving the bacteria anything to break down and feed off.”

There are three basic steps to nighttime hygiene: brushing, flossing, and rinsing with mouthwash. Dr. Zak says the order doesn’t matter, as long as the food particles and plaque are removed. However, she adds, “My preference is for brushing, flossing, and then mouthwash because I feel that brushing first makes it easier to floss.”

Steps for Basic Nighttime Oral Hygiene:

Brushing

Brushing your teeth helps protect them from plaque buildup and tooth decay. Using a soft-bristled brush and toothpaste that contains fluoride, start brushing your teeth at a 45-degree angle to the gums. The correct method, according to the American Dental Association, is to brush back and forth gently in short (tooth-wide) strokes. The ADA suggests brushing the outer tooth surfaces first, then working your way through the inner tooth surfaces and the chewing surfaces of your teeth. The association also recommends using the “toe” of the brush to clean the backs of your front teeth with gentle up-and-down strokes.

Collected from this website: http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/nighttime-oral-care/guide-to-nighttime-oral-health.aspx

A Guide to Flossing Your Teeth

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South Carolina Dentists ergett A Guide to Flossing Your Teeth Dental Spartanburg
A Guide to Flossing

Brushing your teeth is not enough to maintain good oral health over time. Flossing should be a regular part of your oral hygiene routine.

Cleaning the spaces between your teeth and along your gums with dental floss is as important to your oral health as cleaning your teeth with a toothbrush. Just like you brush your teeth every day, flossing should be part of your daily routine.

To better understand why flossing is so important, Richard H. Price, DMD, spokesperson for the American Dental Association (ADA) and a former clinical instructor at Boston University Dental School, compares it to cleaning your home: “You cannot effectively vacuum a house with only one attachment,” he says. “You need other attachments to get into the nooks and crannies. That’s what floss does.”

The Benefits of Flossing to Your Oral Health

There are many benefits to regularly flossing your teeth. Dental floss can help clear food debris and plaque from the spaces between your teeth, where your toothbrush can’t reach. As a result, flossing helps prevent gum or periodontal diseases, tooth decay, and bad breath.

There are certain things to keep in mind to get the most out of flossing:

Use dental floss or an interdental cleaner every day.

Floss at least once a day.

Be gentle when using dental floss so you avoid damaging gum tissue.

If long threads of regular dental floss are too hard for you to hold, use a floss holder.

A Variety of Dental Cleaning Products

Drugstores offer a mindboggling variety of dental cleaning tools. These include:

Waxed dental floss

Un waxed dental floss

Interdental cleaning aids, including picks and special sticks

Oral irrigators, which use water to remove plaque caught between teeth

Collected from this website: http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/101/flossing.aspx

Toothpaste 101

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South Carolina Dentists hdhf Toothpaste 101 Greenville Toothpaste
Toothpaste

Brushing your teeth is the cornerstone of good oral health. Learn about the different types of toothpaste and how to select one that’s right for you.

Toothpaste is not always paste. It can be a gel, powder, or paste that you brush onto your teeth and gums to help get rid of accumulating plaque and improve your oral health. According to the American Dental Association (ADA), toothpaste is important to oral health because it helps to remove plaque and its bacterial buildup on teeth and fights off periodontal (gum) disease. Most toothpaste also contains fluoride, which bolsters tooth enamel and fights tooth decay.

What’s in Toothpaste?

The exact composition of different toothpastes may vary slightly depending on the benefits being touted by the particular brand (such as whitening teeth or reducing gum inflammation). In general, toothpastes include the following ingredients:

Gentle abrasives, such as magnesium carbonate, dehydrated silica gels, calcium carbonate, hydrated aluminum oxides, and phosphate salts.

Glycerol, sorbitol, or other so-called “humectants,” substances that keep the toothpaste from drying out.

Thickeners like seaweed or mineral colloids, synthetic cellulose, or natural gum to give the toothpaste a homogeneous appearance and texture.

Fluoride to help make tooth enamel stronger and more resistant to decay.

Flavoring agents that do not cause tooth decay, such as saccharin.

Detergents, such as sodium lauryl sarcosinate, to make the toothpaste foamy.

How to Pick the Right Toothpaste for Your Teeth

With the dizzying array of toothpaste choices in a typical drugstore aisle, it can be daunting to try and find one that’s right for you. “One almost needs a PhD degree to weather the dental ‘aisle of confusion’,” says Richard H. Price, DMD, spokesperson for the ADA, and a former clinical instructor at Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine.

Collected from this website: http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/101/toothpaste-more-than-just-mint.aspx

Toothbrush Tips to Keep Your Teeth in Shape

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South Carolina Dentists 46s856 Toothbrush Tips to Keep Your Teeth in Shape ADA Greenville
Teeth in Shape

Brushing your teeth seems easy enough. But some toothbrushes are better than others and there is a right and wrong way to brush your teeth.
Brushing your teeth regularly is key to maintaining healthy teeth and gums and preventing periodontal (gum) diseases, but it’s also important to make sure you choose the right toothbrush for your teeth and use proper brushing techniques. Done correctly, brushing your teeth at least twice a day — in the morning and in the evening before going to bed, for at least three minutes — can help ensure long-term dental health.
“It takes time to brush effectively,” says Richard H. Price, DMD, spokesperson for the American Dental Association (ADA) and a former clinical instructor at Boston University Dental School. “Most people just rush through it.” Dr. Price suggests setting a timer for three minutes and brushing and flossing until the time runs out.
Although some ancient civilizations used frayed twigs to clean their teeth, these days toothbrushes come in a variety of manual and powered forms. And the first step to taking good care of your mouth is to choose a toothbrush that’s right for you.
“Choose a brush that has the ADA seal on the box to be sure the bristles are not too hard,” says Price, who is retired from a 35-year dental practice in Newton, Mass. “Then find one that fits comfortably in your hand and mouth. If the brush is comfortable to use, you’ll use it more often and more effectively.”

Collected from this website: http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/101/brushing.aspx

Tobacco Use and Your Oral Health

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South Carolina Dentists wrtwef Tobacco Use and Your Oral Health Dental Medicine Greenville  “The most serious issue is mouth cancer”   Dentistry in south carolina
Your Oral Health

It’s no secret that smoking is bad for your overall health but using tobacco products can have serious consequences on your oral health, too.

In addition to affecting your overall health, tobacco use and smoking can cause a number of oral health issues, ranging from oral cancer to discolored teeth.

“You can get yellow teeth [and] a yellow tongue,” says Thomas Kilgore, DMD, professor of oral and maxillofacial surgery and associate dean at the Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine. “You see a lot of staining on the tongue.”

Smoking and tobacco use can lead to more serious oral health complications as well, including gum disease and oral cancer.

Smoking and Oral Cancer

“The most serious issue is mouth cancer,” Dr. Kilgore says. “It’s hard to say what percentage of people who smoke will get mouth cancer, but the death rate of those who do get it is high — between 40 and 50 percent of all cases, and that hasn’t changed over the last few decades.”

The American Cancer Society estimates that 90 percent of people with oral cancer (cancer affecting the lips, tongue, throat, and mouth) have used tobacco in some form. Likewise, the risk of oral cancer is six times higher among smokers relative to non-smokers. Your individual risk of oral cancer depends on how long you’ve been using tobacco — the longer you use it, the greater your risk.

Smoking and Periodontal Disease

“Smoking cigarettes doesn’t cause dental decay, but it does cause periodontal, or gum, disease,” Kilgore explains. “Bone loss is part of periodontal disease. It starts out as inflammation of the gums. In the natural and unfortunate progression, the bone supporting the roots of your teeth becomes inflamed,” and then the underlying bone can deteriorate, he adds.

Collected from this website: http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/101/dont-smoke.aspx

Oral Hygiene and Your Overall Health

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Oral Hygiene

Poor oral health has been linked to heart disease, stroke, and other health problems. But by changing certain habits, you can improve the health of your mouth and teeth and lessen your risk.

How well you care for your teeth and gums has a powerful effect on your overall health. Neglecting your oral health lead to more than just sore teeth and bad breath — it can open the door to all sorts of health problems, including some pretty nasty diseases like oral cancer. Researchers have found possible connections between gum problems and heart disease, bacterial pneumonia, stroke, and even problem pregnancies.

“You cannot be healthy with an unhealthy mouth any more than one can be healthy with an infected foot,” says Richard H. Price, DMD, spokesperson for the American Dental Association (ADA) and a former clinical instructor at the Boston University Dental School.

The Role of Diet and Lifestyle in Oral Health

A number of dietary habits and lifestyle factors can affect oral health, including:

Sugar consumption. “Having a sugar-laden diet will contribute to tooth decay and gum problems, as the bacteria in the mouth thrive in this environment,” producing tooth and gum-destroying enzymes and acids, says Dr. Price, who retired after 35 years as a dentist in Newton, Mass.

Smoking. Dental care experts have long known that smoking cigarettes and cigars and using tobacco products can cause periodontal disease (gum disease), tooth decay, and oral cancer. Cigars can also cause periodontal disease and throat, or pharyngeal, cancer. “The smoke from tobacco has a toxic effect on gum tissue, and can interfere with blood flow,” Price explains. “Smoking also stains the heck out of teeth, is a direct cause of oral cancer, and can contribute to bad breath.”

Collected from this website: http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/101/healthy-mouth-healthy-body.aspx

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South Carolina Dentists rtyrt-e1489583811735  Dental Greenville
Maintaining Good Dental Care Habits

Maintaining Good Dental Care Habits

Your dentist is only a partner in your dental health. You need to do your part at home to keep periodontal disease at bay.

Taking care of your teeth at home can help you maintain your dental health and prevent periodontal, or gum, disease from developing.

Richard H. Price, DMD, spokesperson for the American Dental Association and a former clinical instructor at the Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, says regular home care should include daily brushing and flossing. “My advice is to brush thoroughly, at least twice a day, once in the morning and once in the evening before going to bed,” says Dr. Price. “Be sure to floss at least once a day. I do it after every meal when I can.” Proper dental care at home, combined with seeing your dentist regularly, is your ticket to good dental health, says Price, who is retired from a 35-year private group dental practice in Newton, Mass.

Dental Health at Home

“Use products that have the ADA (American Dental Association) seal,” says Price. “This means that the products — toothbrush, toothpaste, floss, etc. — are safe to use as directed and will keep your mouth healthy — no gum disease, no cavities.”

Here are some basic principles to follow:

Spend at least three minutes brushing your teeth two times a day. Use a timer if you have to to ensure that you’re spending enough time on your oral care routine.

Use floss at least once a day every day to clean between your teeth.

Buy ADA-approved dental cleaning tools and toothpaste.

“Basically, brush and floss, and do it correctly,” says Price.

Collected from this website: http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/101/taking-care-of-your-teeth-at-home.aspx

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South Carolina Dentists tyhety-e1489583253369  Greenville  Beyond Teeth

Article: Beyond Teeth: What’s Inside Your Mouth?
Good oral health goes beyond brushing and flossing. Find out more about the inside of your mouth and the role its various structures play in speech and digestion.
Your mouth is made up of more than just teeth, so good oral health goes beyond simply brushing and flossing. In addition to your teeth, your mouth is made up of gums, oral mucosa, the upper and lower jaw, the tongue, salivary glands, the uvula, and the frenulum. All of these structures play an important role when it comes to good dental health and are routinely examined when you receive dental care.
The Oral Mucosa
When you open your mouth and look in the mirror, everything that isn’t a tooth is covered by a protective lining called the oral mucosa, which is a mucous membrane similar to the mucous membranes that line your nostrils and inner ears.
The oral mucosa plays an essential role in maintaining your oral health, as well as your overall health, by defending your body from germs and other irritants that enter your mouth. A tough substance called keratin, also found in your fingernails and hair, helps make the oral mucosa resistant to injury.
The Gums
Your gums are the pinkish tissue that surrounds and supports your teeth. Also covered by oral mucosa, gums play a critical role in your oral health. Healthy gums are firm, cover the entire root of the tooth, and do not bleed when brushed, poked, or prodded. Gum disease can ultimately lead to tooth loss, so taking care of your gums by flossing daily is just as essential to dental care as brushing your teeth.
Collected from this website: http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/101/beyond-your-teeth.aspx
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